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Did Instagram's Video Service Just RIP Canadian-Based Keek?

Over the last week, the Internet and media all around has been flooded with stories about Instatgram’s (which Facebook bought for $1 billion in 2012) launch of a new video service to complement their already popular photo service. According to their blog and press release, Instatgram saw 5 million uploads in the first 24 hours, for the 15 second video service.  Rival Vine released a few updates to try and keep its use base active and happy. Vine has 13 million, despite its being owned and operated by Twitter, which has more than 200 million users, and uses have 6 seconds of video length.

However, what about Toronto-based Keek, throughout the many stories talking about Instagram’s new service, the updates to Vine or the comparison of the two, no one is mentioning Keek, not even the Canadian media.

Carpe Diem Keek created a video sharing platform before there was a Vine, in a press release issued in June 2013 by Keek, the startup states to have “surpassed 45 million users, making it the largest in the world with over 24 million new users joining in the last 4 months.”  Much of their growth can be attributed to Kim Kardashian, who the company has hired to use the service as they look to ride her “celebrity” coat tails.  It is surprising that we have not heard of a counter-play from Keek, perhaps the service that limits its users to 36 seconds of video is happy where things are right now.

If we compare this situation to the current RSS-reader wars in which Google announced it is killing Google Reader on July 1, which has triggered a number of companies to come out with products that fill the gap of what consumers want, or ideally will use.  Feedly has taken the bull by the horns and released a slew up updates to their app, resulting in a significant bump in its user base, last week they reported 12 million users.  Betaworks who snapped up the assets of Digg has announced they will be launching a reader shortly.  Even AOL has jumped into the mix, announcing they too will have their own rss reader, although this one still leaves many scratching theirs heads wondering “why.”  There have also been stories that Facebook is looking at releasing some type of reader product, the latest rumours are that it will not be limited to RSS.

Even if Facebook, who has not been good at launching catch up services (Facebook Home (deep integration into HTC phones), Facebook Collections (Pinterest attempt), or even AOL for that matter they have both benefited from the tremendous press around.

Lesson: Carpe diem!